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Growing Pains in Childhood - Fact or Fiction?

Childhood Limb Pain (CLP), Growing Pains in Children
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More information about growing pains in children

Learn the natural way to help your child out of growing pains

Jordan Enjoying a Game of Rugby

Jordan Playing Rugby at Chew Valley RFC


The biggest irony of growing pains is that they tend to occur in areas of the body where growth is not actually occuring. The areas inbetween the growth plates are the most common sites of pain, whereas growth tends to be near to the joints, which is not normally the site of growing pains. There is good reason to believe that growing pains are actually muscle injury following abnormal daytime activity, small strains of muscle or myofascial connective tissue. Micro tearing is another possibility.

Myofascial tissue release is removing tightness in muscle or myofascial tissue, areas of tissue where trigger points can occur following activity or sluggish cleansing of muscle tissue following exercise. Small strains, micro tearing and trigger points are all helped by the techniques portrayed in the DVD, so if this is where you think the problem lies, you will be in a great position to help your child's rehabilitation, quickly and with least disruption.

Should we call them "growing pains"?
The idea of growing pains as a problem directly related to bone growth appears to be untrue. Or, at least the evidence is thin. Perhaps is should be called something like "childhood limb pain", or "recurrent childhood limb pain", or something a little more accurate. In the end parents will probably come back to the common name of growing pains because that is the preception. But perhaps it is more important to make sure that a serious or dangerous medical condition is not overlooked, prior to downgrading the condition to growing pains.

Things like strains, sprains, muscle tear, micro tears, trigger points, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, fracture, leukaemia, joint infection (including hot, red, swollen joints), bone infection (including hot, swollen areas around bone), muscle infection, lymphoedema, fever (high temperature), vomiting, rashes, limping, loss of appetite, fatigue or communication/behaviour difficulties. Don't forget, knock knees and flat feet will also have an effect on how the muscles work together. Ages of Children who are at risk of Growing Pains

Are growing pains all in the mind?
Many people, including many doctors and other members of the medical profession, think of growing pains as an old wives' tale, or a seeking for attention. Well, the fact is, children with growing pains will wake in the night, in distress, in pain, often with uncontrollable tears, and no memory of it in the morning. And, that is the basic criteria. Any doubts by the parents of that diagnosis, should be investigated by a doctor, especially if the symptoms include any of the above.

More and more studies are tending to show that growing pains have a connection to emotional stress. Emotional stress in children is usually the result of lack of communication or lack of understanding of a particular issue. Regular talk times with children, where they can say what they feel is wrong, may help to allay their fears of, say, school, playtime, home, relationships to other family members and friends.

Bad dreams, may also be a trigger. It is sometimes suggested that dreaming of running, jumping or other sporting activities, re-enacting a daytime experience maybe a possible trigger. Perhaps this is clutching at straws, but in the absence of any proven evidence, there is some logic to this as a theory. The problem here is asking a youngster what they've been dreaming about is like asking them to remember the trip down the birth canal.

In conclusion, I think it's fair to say that growing pains are very real, but it's also fair to say that, even though the child may be experiencing a great deal of pain, no lasting damage is happening to the child's muscles, bones, myofascial tissue or growth plates.

If you have children who suffer from growing pains, order your DVD today!
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DISCLAIMER: This information is not presented by a medical practitioner and is for educational and informational purposes only. The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read.

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